Helmet Express ERR_BLOCKED_BY_RESPONSE.NotSameOrigin 200

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Helmet Express ERR_BLOCKED_BY_RESPONSE.NotSameOrigin 200

How to solve Helmet Express ERR_BLOCKED_BY_RESPONSE.NotSameOrigin 200

tl;dr: disable the Cross-Origin-Embedder-Policy header, enabled by default in Helmet v5.
app.use( helmet({ crossOriginEmbedderPolicy: false, // ... }) );
Helmet maintainer here.
Helmet sets the the Cross-Origin-Embedder-Policy HTTP response header to require-corp.
Setting this header means that loading cross-origin resources (like an image from another resource) is trickier. For example, loading a cross-origin like this…
<img alt="My picture" src="https://example.com/image.png">
…won’t work unless example.com explicitly allows it, by setting some response headers of its own. Your browser will try to load example.com/image.png, and if it’s not explicitly allowed, your browser will drop the response.
To fix this, you can prevent Helmet from setting the Cross-Origin-Embedder-Policy header, like this:
app.use( helmet({ crossOriginEmbedderPolicy: false, // ... }) );
I made a small sample app you can use to play around with this. In my testing, it doesn’t seem to work in HTTP but it does over HTTPS, which might explain why things only break in production.

Helmet Express ERR_BLOCKED_BY_RESPONSE.NotSameOrigin 200

tl;dr: disable the Cross-Origin-Embedder-Policy header, enabled by default in Helmet v5.
app.use( helmet({ crossOriginEmbedderPolicy: false, // ... }) );
Helmet maintainer here.
Helmet sets the the Cross-Origin-Embedder-Policy HTTP response header to require-corp.
Setting this header means that loading cross-origin resources (like an image from another resource) is trickier. For example, loading a cross-origin like this…
<img alt="My picture" src="https://example.com/image.png">
…won’t work unless example.com explicitly allows it, by setting some response headers of its own. Your browser will try to load example.com/image.png, and if it’s not explicitly allowed, your browser will drop the response.
To fix this, you can prevent Helmet from setting the Cross-Origin-Embedder-Policy header, like this:
app.use( helmet({ crossOriginEmbedderPolicy: false, // ... }) );
I made a small sample app you can use to play around with this. In my testing, it doesn’t seem to work in HTTP but it does over HTTPS, which might explain why things only break in production.

Solution 1

tl;dr: disable the Cross-Origin-Embedder-Policy header, enabled by default in Helmet v5.

app.use(
  helmet({
    crossOriginEmbedderPolicy: false,
    // ...
  })
);

Helmet maintainer here.

Helmet sets the the Cross-Origin-Embedder-Policy HTTP response header to require-corp.

Setting this header means that loading cross-origin resources (like an image from another resource) is trickier. For example, loading a cross-origin like this…

<img alt="My picture" src="https://example.com/image.png">

…won’t work unless example.com explicitly allows it, by setting some response headers of its own. Your browser will try to load example.com/image.png, and if it’s not explicitly allowed, your browser will drop the response.

To fix this, you can prevent Helmet from setting the Cross-Origin-Embedder-Policy header, like this:

app.use(
  helmet({
    crossOriginEmbedderPolicy: false,
    // ...
  })
);

I made a small sample app you can use to play around with this. In my testing, it doesn’t seem to work in HTTP but it does over HTTPS, which might explain why things only break in production.

Original Author Evan Hahn Of This Content

Solution 2

I had this same problem, this fixed it:

helmet({
    crossOriginResourcePolicy: false,
})

Original Author Promise Ihunna Of This Content

Solution 3

After a long look on google I get the solution from here :
https://github.com/helmetjs/helmet/issues/176
I add this line :

res.setHeader('Cross-Origin-Resource-Policy', 'same-site');

and just do refresh and clear cache (cmd + R on MAC and ctrl+R on others) and it’s worked like a charm.
Thanks Evan Hahn

Original Author edited Jan 18 at 9:16 Of This Content

Solution 4

In my case, I used that way

    helmet({
      crossOriginResourcePolicy: false,
    })

The issue is with the cross-origin resource policy which should be same-site as the browser treats as another origin.

Original Author devXd Of This Content

Conclusion

So This is all About This Tutorial. Hope This Tutorial Helped You. Thank You.

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ittutorial team

I am an Information Technology Engineer. I have Completed my MCA And I have 4 Year Plus Experience, I am a web developer with knowledge of multiple back-end platforms Like PHP, Node.js, Python and frontend JavaScript frameworks Like Angular, React, and Vue.

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