lvalue required as left operand of assignment error when using C++

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lvalue required as left operand of assignment error when using C++

How to solve lvalue required as left operand of assignment error when using C++

When you have an assignment operator in a statement, the LHS of the operator must be something the language calls an lvalue. If the LHS of the operator does not evaluate to an lvalue, the value from the RHS cannot be assigned to the LHS.
You cannot use:
10 = 20;
since 10 does not evaluate to an lvalue.
You can use:
int i; i = 20;
since i does evaluate to an lvalue.
You cannot use:
int i; i + 1 = 20;
since i + 1 does not evaluate to an lvalue.
In your case, p + 1 does not evaluate to an lavalue. Hence, you cannot use
p + 1 = p;

lvalue required as left operand of assignment error when using C++

When you have an assignment operator in a statement, the LHS of the operator must be something the language calls an lvalue. If the LHS of the operator does not evaluate to an lvalue, the value from the RHS cannot be assigned to the LHS.
You cannot use:
10 = 20;
since 10 does not evaluate to an lvalue.
You can use:
int i; i = 20;
since i does evaluate to an lvalue.
You cannot use:
int i; i + 1 = 20;
since i + 1 does not evaluate to an lvalue.
In your case, p + 1 does not evaluate to an lavalue. Hence, you cannot use
p + 1 = p;

Solution 1

When you have an assignment operator in a statement, the LHS of the operator must be something the language calls an lvalue. If the LHS of the operator does not evaluate to an lvalue, the value from the RHS cannot be assigned to the LHS.

You cannot use:

10 = 20;

since 10 does not evaluate to an lvalue.

You can use:

int i;
i = 20;

since i does evaluate to an lvalue.

You cannot use:

int i;
i + 1 = 20;

since i + 1 does not evaluate to an lvalue.

In your case, p + 1 does not evaluate to an lavalue. Hence, you cannot use

p + 1 = p;

Original Author R Sahu Of This Content

Solution 2

To assign, you should use p=p+1; instead of p+1=p;

int main()
{

   int x[3]={4,5,6};
   int *p=x;
   p=p+1; /*You just needed to switch the terms around*/
   cout<<p<<endl;
   getch();
}

Original Author jh314 Of This Content

Solution 3

Put simply, an lvalue is something that can appear on the left-hand side of an assignment, typically a variable or array element.

So if you define int *p, then p is an lvalue. p+1, which is a valid expression, is not an lvalue.

If you’re trying to add 1 to p, the correct syntax is:

p = p + 1;

Original Author dbush Of This Content

Solution 4

if you use an assignment operator but use it in wrong way or in wrong place,
then you’ll get this types of errors!

suppose if you type:
p+1=p; you will get the error!!

you will get the same error for this:
if(ch>=’a’ && ch=’z’)
as you see can see that I i tried to assign in if() statement!!!
how silly I am!!! right??
ha ha

actually i forgot to give less then(<) sign
if(ch>=’a’ && ch<=’z’)

and got the error!!

Original Author Rimon Of This Content

Conclusion

So This is all About This Tutorial. Hope This Tutorial Helped You. Thank You.

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I am an Information Technology Engineer. I have Completed my MCA And I have 4 Year Plus Experience, I am a web developer with knowledge of multiple back-end platforms Like PHP, Node.js, Python and frontend JavaScript frameworks Like Angular, React, and Vue.

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