Visual Studio Code does not detect Virtual Environments

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Visual Studio Code does not detect Virtual Environments

  1. How to solve Visual Studio Code does not detect Virtual Environments

    In VSCode open your command palette — Ctrl+Shift+P by default
    Look for Python: Select Interpreter
    In Select Interpreter choose Enter interpreter path... and then Find...
    Navigate to your venv folder — eg, ~/pyenvs/myenv/ or \Users\Foo\Bar\PyEnvs\MyEnv\
    In the virtual environment folder choose <your-venv-name>/bin/python or <your-venv-name>/bin/python3

    The issue is that VSCode's Python extension by default uses the main python or python3 program while venv effectively creates a “new” python/python3 executable (that is kind of the point of venv) so the extension does not have access to anything (available modules, namespaces, etc) that you have installed through a venv since the venv specific installations are not available to the main Python interpreter (again, this is by design—like how applications installed in a VM are not available to the host OS)

  2. Visual Studio Code does not detect Virtual Environments

    In VSCode open your command palette — Ctrl+Shift+P by default
    Look for Python: Select Interpreter
    In Select Interpreter choose Enter interpreter path... and then Find...
    Navigate to your venv folder — eg, ~/pyenvs/myenv/ or \Users\Foo\Bar\PyEnvs\MyEnv\
    In the virtual environment folder choose <your-venv-name>/bin/python or <your-venv-name>/bin/python3

    The issue is that VSCode's Python extension by default uses the main python or python3 program while venv effectively creates a “new” python/python3 executable (that is kind of the point of venv) so the extension does not have access to anything (available modules, namespaces, etc) that you have installed through a venv since the venv specific installations are not available to the main Python interpreter (again, this is by design—like how applications installed in a VM are not available to the host OS)

Solution 1

  1. In VSCode open your command palette — Ctrl+Shift+P by default

  2. Look for Python: Select Interpreter

  3. In Select Interpreter choose Enter interpreter path... and then Find...

  4. Navigate to your venv folder — eg, ~/pyenvs/myenv/ or \Users\Foo\Bar\PyEnvs\MyEnv\

  5. In the virtual environment folder choose <your-venv-name>/bin/python or <your-venv-name>/bin/python3


The issue is that VSCode’s Python extension by default uses the main python or python3 program while venv effectively creates a “new” python/python3 executable (that is kind of the point of venv) so the extension does not have access to anything (available modules, namespaces, etc) that you have installed through a venv since the venv specific installations are not available to the main Python interpreter (again, this is by design—like how applications installed in a VM are not available to the host OS)

Original Author ZarakshR Of This Content

Solution 2

OK, I found a solution.
Firstly uninstall Visual Studio Code. Go to C:\Users\Your_profile and delete the folders related to Visual Studio Code that start with a period. Then turn on showing hidden folders and go to C:\Users\Your_profile\AppData. Type vscode in the file finder and remove all foders and files related to Visual Studio Code. Finally, install Visual Studio Code and enjoy the virtual environments. 🙂

Original Author edited Apr 1, 2021 at 8:52 Of This Content

Solution 3

VS Code: Python Interpreter can’t find my venv

The only solution I found was to delete the venv and recreate it. I followed these steps but I’ll provide a brief summary for Windows:

  1. Activate your virtualenv. Go to the parent folder where your Virtual Environment is located and run venv\scripts\activate. Keep in mind that the first name “venv” can vary.
  2. Create a requirements.txt file. pip freeze requirements.txt
  3. deactivate to exit the venv
  4. rm venv to delete the venv
  5. py -m venv venv to create a new one
  6. pip install -r requirements.txt to install the requirements.

This worked for me, I didn’t delete the old, but created a new python -m venv /path/newVenv in the ~/Envs folder, C:\Users\Admin\Envs. Maybe VS Code is searching in the ~/Envs folder, or it needs to be added to the python.path in the View -> Command Pallete -> >Preferences: Open User Settings.

Original Author DMinovski Of This Content

Solution 4

None of the suggestions on this thread worked for me. That said, I don’t think the issue lies with VS Code, it’s venv. I wound up installing PyCharm to fix this. After you’ve downloaded:

PyCharm > Preferences > search “interpreter” > Project: Python Interpreter > Click ‘+’ > in Virtualenv Environment > New environment (should automatically populate everything for a new env). Select OK, OK, OK.

In the bottom left, you’ll see Git | TODO | Problems | Terminal…etc. Click “Terminal” and you should see your environment already activated. From there, pip3 install your dependencies. Close PyCharm.

Go back to VS Code, open your project, and follow the suggestions above to select the Virtualenv (mine was ‘venv’: venv) as your interpreter.

Finally resolved.

Original Author Tucker Of This Content

Conclusion

So This is all About This Tutorial. Hope This Tutorial Helped You. Thank You.

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I am an Information Technology Engineer. I have Completed my MCA And I have 4 Year Plus Experience, I am a web developer with knowledge of multiple back-end platforms Like PHP, Node.js, Python and frontend JavaScript frameworks Like Angular, React, and Vue.

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